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N C C A M Research Blog

NIH Symposium To Highlight Research on Self-Management of Chronic Pain

April 16, 2013
Dr. Briggs
Josephine Briggs, M.D.

Director
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

View Dr. Briggs's biographical sketch

As the Nation’s medical research agency, NIH supports the full spectrum of pain research, from increasing basic understanding of pain mechanisms through translating new discoveries into prevention and treatment strategies. Pain is a major strategic focus for NCCAM in the context of complementary health approaches. About 30 percent of NCCAM’s research portfolio supports research on pain. Our intramural research program, headed by Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D., focuses on the role of the brain in perceiving, modifying, and managing pain. I believe that NCCAM’s investment in pain research will advance the science and practice of pain management.

I’m blogging today to welcome you to attend (in person or via live Web-streaming) The Eighth Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, which will take place on May 29–30, 2013, on the NIH campus. The scientific presentations this year will focus on “Integrated Self-Management Strategies for Chronic Pain.”

Researchers, health professionals, and the public are welcome to attend the meeting. I especially encourage NCCAM-funded investigators to come, network, and join our conversation about how to strengthen pain research.

Comments

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For over 40 years, I’m practicing and teaching medical and sports massage. Based on my personal experiences and experiences of many of my colleagues, massage therapy is clinically proven to be effective methodology in pain management. Being it cases of tissue injury pains and/or brain-generated pains, anxieties etc., orthopedic and medical stress management massage are very effective.Below is the link to my article on this subject.

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Thank you for your wonderful comments.  I work at The Massage Buddha and we focus on pain management.  It is a very important and relevant topic today and wonderful that the NIH is focusing on incorporating massage practices into pain management.  

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