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Thunder God Vine

Common Names: 
thunder god vine, lei gong teng
Latin Name: 
Tripterygium wilfordii

ThunderGodVine.jpg

Thunder god vine

© Frédéric Tournay, The Plant Kaleidoscope http://www.biologie.uni-ulm.de/systax/dendrologie/

On this page:

  • Sources
  • Introduction

    This fact sheet provides basic information about thunder god vine—common names, what the science says, potential side effects and cautions, and resources for more information.

    Thunder god vine is a perennial vine native to China, Japan, and Korea. It has been used in China for health purposes for more than 400 years. In traditional Chinese medicine, it has been used for conditions involving inflammation or overactivity of the immune system. Currently, thunder god vine is used as a traditional or folk remedy for excessive menstrual periods and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and lupus.

    Extracts are prepared from the skinned root of thunder god vine.

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    What the Science Says

    • Laboratory findings suggest that thunder god vine may fight inflammation, suppress the immune system, and have anti-cancer effects.
    • Although early evidence is promising, there have been few high-quality studies of thunder god vine in people. Results from a large study funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), which compared an extract of thunder god vine root with a conventional medicine (sulfasalazine) for rheumatoid arthritis, found that participants’ symptoms (e.g., joint pain and swelling, inflammation) improved more significantly with thunder god vine than with sulfasalazine.
    • A small study on thunder god vine applied to the skin found benefits for rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.
    • There is not enough scientific evidence to assess thunder god vine’s use for any other health conditions.

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    Side Effects and Cautions

    • Thunder god vine can cause severe side effects and can be poisonous if it is not carefully extracted from the skinned root. Other parts of the plant—including the leaves, flowers, and skin of the root—are highly poisonous and can cause death.
    • A number of participants in the NIAMS study experienced gastrointestinal adverse effects such as diarrhea, indigestion, and nausea, as well as upper respiratory tract infections. (The rate of adverse effects was similar in the thunder god vine and sulfasalazine groups.)
    • Thunder god vine can also cause hair loss, headache, menstrual changes, and skin rash.
    • There are no consistent, high-quality thunder god vine products being manufactured in the United States. Preparations of thunder god vine made outside the United States (for example, in China) can sometimes be obtained, but it is not possible to verify whether they are safe and effective.
    • Thunder god vine has been found to decrease bone mineral density in women who take the herb for 5 years or longer. This side effect may be of particular concern to women who have osteoporosis or are at risk for the condition.
    • Thunder god vine contains chemicals that might decrease male fertility by changing sperm.
    • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary health practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care. For tips about talking with your health care providers about complementary and alternative medicine, see NCCAM's Time to Talk campaign.

    Search the scientific literature for potential herb-drug interactions

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    Sources

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    For More Information

    NCCAM Clearinghouse

    The NCCAM Clearinghouse provides information on NCCAM and complementary health approaches, including publications and searches of Federal databases of scientific and medical literature. The Clearinghouse does not provide medical advice, treatment recommendations, or referrals to practitioners.

    Toll-free in the U.S.: 
    1-888-644-6226
    TTY (for deaf and hard-of-hearing callers): 
    1-866-464-3615
    E-mail: 

    PubMed®

    A service of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), PubMed® contains publication information and (in most cases) brief summaries of articles from scientific and medical journals.

    Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), National Institutes of Health (NIH)

    ODS seeks to strengthen knowledge and understanding of dietary supplements by evaluating scientific information, supporting research, sharing research results, and educating the public. Its resources include publications (such as Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know), fact sheets on a variety of specific supplement ingredients and products (such as vitamin D and multivitamin/mineral supplements), and the PubMed Dietary Supplement Subset.

    PubMed Dietary Supplement Subset: ods.od.nih.gov/Research/PubMed_Dietary_Supplement_Subset.aspx

    E-mail: 

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    This publication is not copyrighted and is in the public domain. Duplication is encouraged.

    NCCAM has provided this material for your information. It is not intended to substitute for the medical expertise and advice of your primary health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any decisions about treatment or care with your health care provider. The mention of any product, service, or therapy is not an endorsement by NCCAM.

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    NCCAM Publication No.: 
    D400
    Created: 
    October 2007
    Updated: 
    April 2012