National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

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Congressional Justification 2015

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)

On this page:

  • National Advisory
    Council for
    Complementary and
    Alternative Medicine

  • Office of the Director

    Josephine P. Briggs, M.D.
     Director

    David Shurtleff, Ph.D.
    Deputy Director

    • Office of Clinical and
      Regulatory Affairs

      Catherine Meyers, M.D.
       Director

    • Office of Administrative
       Operations

      Wendy Liffers, J.D., M.A.
      Executive Officer

    • Office of Communications
      and Public Liaison

      Alyssa Cotler, M.P.H.
       Director

    • Office of Policy,
      Planning, and Evaluation

      Karin Lohman, Ph.D.
       Director

    • Division of
      Extramural Research

      Emmeline Edwards, Ph.D.
       Director

      • Basic and Mechanistic Research in Complementary and Integrative Health Branch

        Emmeline Edwards, Ph.D.
        Acting Chief

      • Clinical Research in Complementary and Integrative Health Branch

        Emmeline Edwards, Ph.D.
        Acting Chief

    • Division of
      Intramural Research

      M. Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D.
      Scientific Director

      • Clinical Investigations
         Branch

        M. Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D.
        Acting Chief

      • Pain and Integrative Neuroscience Laboratory

        M. Catherine Bushnell, Ph.D.
        Acting Chief

    • Division of
      Extramural Activities

      Martin Goldrosen, Ph.D.
       Director

      • Office of
        Scientific Review

        Dale Birkle Dreer, Ph.D.
         Chief

      • Office of Grants Management

        George Tucker, M.B.A.
         Director


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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the PHS Act with respect to complementary and alternative medicine, [$124,296,000] $124,509,000.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Amounts Available for Obligation 1
(Dollars in Thousands)
Source of Funding FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget
1 Excludes the following amounts for reimbursable activities carried out by this account:
FY 2013—$300         FY 2014—$455         FY 2015—$455
Appropriation $128,057 $124,296 $124,509
Type 1 Diabetes 0 0 0
Rescission -256 0 0
Sequestration -6,428 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted appropriation $121,373 $124,296 $124,509
FY 2013 Secretary's Transfer -708 0 0
OAR HIV/AIDS Transfers 0 0 0
Comparative transfers to NLM for NCBI and Public Access -144 -171 0
National Children's Study Transfers 103 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority $120,624 $124,125 $124,509
Unobligated balance, start of year 0 0 0
Unobligated balance, end of year 0 0 0
Subtotal, adjusted budget authority $120,624 $124,125 $124,509
Unobligated balance lapsing -1 0 0
Total obligations $120,623 $124,125 $124,509

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Budget Mechanism—Total1
(Dollars in Thousands)
MECHANISM FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Enacted2 FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY 2014
No. Amount No. Amount No. Amount No. Amount

1 All items in italics and brackets are non-add entries. FY 2013 and FY 2014 levels are shown on a comparable basis to FY 2015.

2 The amounts in the FY 2014 column take into account funding reallocations, and therefore may not add to the total budget authority reflected herein.

Research Projects:                
Noncompeting 118 $49,685 133 $59,366 133 $58,015 0 ‑$1,351
Administrative Supplements (11) 2,651 (10) 2,000 (10) 2,000 (0) 0
Competing:                
Renewal 2 2,151 0 0 0 0 0 0
New 44 17,835 32 13,930 36 15,597 4 1,667
Supplements 1 119 0 0 0 0 0 0
Subtotal, Competing 47 $20,105 32 $13,930 36 $15,597 4 $1,667
Subtotal, RPGs 165 $72,441 165 $75,296 169 $75,612 4 $316
SBIR/STTR 7 3,009 7 3,205 7 3,310 0 105
Research Project Grants 172 $75,450 172 $78,501 176 $78,922 4 $421
Research Centers:                
Specialized/Comprehensive 5 $3,155 5 $3,372 5 $3,372 0 $0
Clinical Research 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biotechnology 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Comparative Medicine 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers in Minority Institutions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Research Centers 5 $3,155 5 $3,372 5 $3,372 0 $0
Other Research:                
Research Careers 37 $4,806 37 $4,771 37 $4,771 0 $0
Cancer Education 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cooperative Clinical Research 0 205 0 0 0 0 0 0
Biomedical Research Support 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Minority Biomedical Research Support 0 229 0 183 0 0 0 ‑183
Other 10 1,480 10 1,199 10 1,199 0 0
Other Research 47 $6,720 47 $6,153 47 $5,970 0 ‑$183
Total Research Grants 224 $85,326 224 $88,026 228 $88,264 4 $238
Ruth L Kirchstein Training Awards: FTTPs   FTTPs   FTTPs   FTTPs  
Individual Awards 13 $628 12 $643 12 $653 0 $10
Institutional Awards 43 2,597 43 2,590 43 2,631 0 41
Total Research Training 56 $3,225 55 $3,233 55 $3,284 0 $51
Research & Develop. Contracts 12 $8,950 11 $8,923 11 $9,094 0 $171
(SBIR/STTR) (non-add) (0) (2) (0) (7) (0) (7) (0)  
Intramural Research 8 7,956 8 8,131 8 8,212 0 81
Res. Management & Support 66 15,166 66 15,500 66 15,655 0 155
Res. Management & Support (SBIR Admin) (non-add) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0) (0)
Construction   0   0   0   0
Buildings and Facilities   0   0   0   0
Total, NCCAM 74 $120,624 74 $124,125 74 $124,509 0 $384

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Major Changes in the Fiscal Year 2015 President's Budget Request

Major changes by budget mechanism and/or budget activity detail are briefly described below. The FY 2015 President’s Budget request for the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine is $124.5 million, an increase of $0.4 million over the FY 2014 level.

Research Project Grants (+$0.421 million; total $78.922 million):
NCCAM will support a total of 176 Research Project Grant (RPG) awards in FY 2015. Noncompeting RPGs will decrease by $1.351 million. Competing RPG awards will increase by 4 and will increase by $1.667 million.

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Summary of Changes
(Dollars in Thousands)
FY 2014 Enacted $124,125
FY 2015 President's Budget $124,509
Net change $384
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Summary of Changes1 (continued)
CHANGES FY 2015 President's Budget Change from FY 2014
FTEs Budget Authority FTEs Budget Authority
1 The amounts in the Change from FY 2014 column take into account funding reallocations, and therefore may not add to the net change reflected herein.
A. Built-in:        
1. Intramural Research:        
a. Annualization of January 2014 pay increase & benefits   $1,537   $5
b. January FY 2015 pay increase & benefits   1,537   12
c. Zero more days of pay (n/a for 2015)   1,537   0
d. Differences attributable to change in FTE   1,537   0
e. Payment for centrally furnished services   1,364   8
f. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, other expenses, and non-recurring costs   5,311   52
Subtotal       $77
2. Research Management and Support:        
a. Annualization of January 2014 pay increase & benefits   $9,842   $25
b. January FY 2015 pay increase & benefits   9,842   74
c. Zero more days of pay (n/a for 2015)   9,842   0
d. Differences attributable to change in FTE   9,842   0
e. Payment for centrally furnished services   387   2
f. Increased cost of laboratory supplies, materials, other expenses, and non-recurring costs   5,427   3
Subtotal       $104
Subtotal, Built-in       $181
  No. Amount No. Amount
B. Program:        
1. Research Project Grants:        
a. Noncompeting 133 $60,015 0 ‑$1,351
b. Competing 36 15,597 4 1,667
c. SBIR/STTR 7 3,310 0 105
Subtotal, RPGs 176 $78,922 4 $421
2. Research Centers 5 $3,372 0 $0
3. Other Research 47 5,970 0 ‑183
4. Research Training 55 3,284 0 51
5. Research and development contracts 11 9,094 0 171
Subtotal, Extramural   $100,642   $460
  FTEs   FTEs  
6. Intramural Research 8 $8,212 0 $4
7. Research Management and Support 66 15,655 0 51
8. Construction   0   0
9. Buildings and Facilities   0   0
Subtotal, program 74 $124,509 0 $515
Total changes       $384

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Fiscal Year 2015 Budget Graphs

 

History of Budget Authority and FTEs

Bar chart of Funding Levels by Fiscal Year. See table immediately below for data.
Funding Levels by Fiscal Year*
Fiscal Year Dollars in Millions
2011 $127.7
2012 $127.8
2013 $120.6
2014 $124.1
2015 $124.5

*FY 2011 are non-comparable for NCBI/PA

Bar chart of Full-Time Employees by fiscal year. See table immediately below for data.
Full-Time Employees by Fiscal Year*
FY FTEs
2011 69
2012 69
2013 74
2014 74
2015 74

*FYs 2011 and 2012 are non-comparable for DEAS transfer.


 

Distribution by Mechanism

A pie chart of distribution of funds by mechanism for fiscal year 2015. See table immediately below for data.
FY 2015 Budget Mechanism
Mechanism Dollars in Thousands Percent
of
Budget
Research Project Grants $78,922 63%
Research Centers $3,372 3%
Other Research $5,970 5%
Research Training $3,284 3%
R&D Contracts $9,094 6%
Intramural Research $8,212 7%
RMS $15,655 13%

 

Change by Selected Mechanism

A bar graph reflecting the change in mechanism as a percent between fiscal years 2012 and 2014.
FY 2015 Estimated Percent Change from FY 2014 Mechanism
Mechanism Percent
Change
Research Project Grants 0.54%
Research Centers 0.00%
Other Research ‑2.97%
Research Training 1.58%
R&D Contracts 1.92%
Intramural Research 1.00%
Res. Mgmt. & Support 1.00%

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Budget Authority by Activity1
(Dollars in Thousands)
  FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Enacted2 FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY 2014

1. Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.

2. The amounts in the FY 2014 column take into account funding reallocations, and therefore may not add to the total budget authority reflected herein.

Extramural Research FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount FTEs Amount
Detail:                
Clinical Research   $51,609   $53,027   $53,271   $243
Basic Research   37,848   38,888   39,017   129
Training   8,046   8,267   8,355   88
Subtotal, Extramural   $97,502   $100,182   $100,642   $460
Intramural Research 8 $7,956 8 $8,131 8 $8,212 0 $81
Research Management & Support 66 $15,166 66 $15,500 66 $15,655 0 $155
TOTAL 74 $120,624 74 $124,125 74 $124,509 0 $384

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Authorizing Legislation
  PHS Act/Other Citation U.S. Code Citation 2014 Amount Authorized FY 2014 Enacted 2015 Amount Authorized FY 2015 President’s Budget
Research and Investigation Section 301 42§241 Indefinite Combined   Indefinite Combined  
        $124,125,000   $124,509,000
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Section 401(a) 42§281 Indefinite   Indefinite  
Total, Budget Authority         $124,125,000     $124,509,000

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Appropriations History
Fiscal Year Budget Estimate
to Congress
House Allowance Senate Allowance Appropriation
2005 $121,116,000 $121,116,000 $121,900,000 $123,116,000
Rescission       ($1,011,000)
2006 $122,692,000 $122,692,000 $126,978,000 $122,692,000
Rescission       ($1,227,000)
2007 $120,554,000 $120,554,000 $121,982,000 $121,576,000
Rescission       $0
2008 $121,699,000 $123,380,000 $124,213,000 $121,577,000
Rescission       ($2,162,000)
Supplemental       $647,000
2009 $121,695,000 $125,878,000 $125,082,000 $125,471,000
Rescission       $0
2010 $127,241,000 $129,953,000 $127,591,000 $128,844,000
Rescission       $0
2011 $132,004,000   $131,796,000 $128,844,000
Rescission       ($1,131,327)
2012 $131,002,000 $131,002,000 $126,275,000 $128,299,000
Rescission       ($242,485)
2013 $127,930,000   $128,318,000 $128,056,515
Rescission       ($256,113)
Sequestration       ($6,427,556)
2014 $129,041,000   $128,183,000 $124,296,000
Rescission       $0
2015 $124,509,000      

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Justification of Budget Request

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Authorizing Legislation: Section 301 and title IV of the Public Health Service Act, as amended.

Budget Authority (BA):

  FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY 2014
BA $120,624,389 $124,125,000 $124,509,000 + $384,000
FTE 74 74 74 0

Program funds are allocated as follows: Competitive Grants/Cooperative Agreements; Contracts; Direct Federal/Intramural and Other.

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Director's Overview

The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is the Federal Government’s lead agency for supporting scientific research on complementary practices and health interventions. Complementary and integrative health practices, which often have origins outside of conventional medicine, are widely used and increasingly being incorporated into health care systems. In fact, nearly 40 percent of Americans are integrating complementary health interventions into their health care and personal health practices.1 While decisions about the use of these interventions are sometimes made with the guidance of a health care provider, this is often not the case. Furthermore, both consumers and providers are often confronted with limited science- and evidence-based information about the safety and effectiveness of these approaches.

NCCAM’s approach to setting priorities and investment in research is guided by the need for rigorous evidence that ultimately may have a significant impact on public health. One example of this approach involves clinical trial support by NCCAM and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute on the efficacy of using chelating agents to remove heavy metals from the body to prevent heart attacks. The benefit of this therapy had been debated for years. Recent results from a trial involving 1,700 patients who had suffered a prior heart attack showed a modest reduction in the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, but most importantly, a significant positive effect in diabetic patients, including reduced mortality.2 A follow-on study in patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease is being explored.

Reducing Pain and Improving Symptom Management: A common reason Americans turn to complementary and integrative health practices is for the management of pain. Chronic pain affects an estimated 116 million Americans—more than the total affected by heart disease, cancer, and diabetes combined—and costs the nation up to $635 billion annually in medical costs and lost productivity.3 Conventional medical management often provides incomplete relief. While there is evidence that some complementary nonpharmacological interventions (i.e., massage, spinal manipulation, yoga, meditation, and acupuncture) may be helpful, additional scientific evidence is needed to uncover how these interventions work, for what type of pain condition, and for determining the optimal method of practice and delivery.

The NCCAM extramural and intramural research programs have made a significant investment in the study of pain management. For example, NCCAM is fostering research on the use and efficacy of complementary approaches for pain management in military and veteran populations. In conjunction with the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Department of Veterans Affairs, NCCAM issued Funding Opportunity Announcements that encouraged research on the nonpharmacological management of pain and other symptoms experienced by military personnel and veterans (see program portrait in Program Descriptions and Accomplishments).

NCCAM’s intramural pain research program is focusing on the role of the brain in pain processing and control and how emotion, attention, environment, and genetics affect pain perception. The program engages and leverages the exceptional basic and clinical neuroscience and neuroimaging efforts at NIH (see program portrait in Program Descriptions and Accomplishments).

Advancing Research on Natural Products: NCCAM also focuses on the scientific exploration of the underlying biological mechanisms of natural products such as dietary supplements, herbal medicines, botanicals, and probiotics. To enhance the natural products research portfolio, NCCAM, the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences are establishing a Center for Advancing Natural Products Technology and Innovation. This new center is expected to propel needed innovations in technology and methodology, reduce resource redundancies, and better support the needs of the natural products community.

Given the widespread use of natural products, both effectiveness and safety are major public health issues. Accordingly, NCCAM supports research on the biological mechanisms for both beneficial and harmful effects of natural products. For example, some supplements such as St. John’s wort can interfere with the action of conventional pharmaceuticals while other natural products can enhance drug actions. Information on these interactions is of variable quality and often not readily available to healthcare providers and consumers. In FY 2015, NCCAM expects to launch an initiative that will develop rigorous methods to evaluate potential interactions between dietary supplements and medications. Additionally, the initiative will guide future efforts to make information about interactions more reliable and easier to access. Ultimately, these efforts will help to ensure that consumers and healthcare providers are better informed of the potential risks and/or benefits associated with the combined use of natural products and medications.

Nurturing Researchers: NCCAM supports a variety of high quality training and career development programs to increase the number, quality, and diversity of well-prepared and skilled researchers who can advance the field of complementary and integrative health research. A new initiative, the Interdisciplinary Complementary and Integrative Health Clinical Training Award, will fund partnerships between research intensive institutions and institutions with curricula focused on clinical training of practitioners in complementary modalities and disciplines. This initiative will strengthen the research acumen and ability of complementary and integrative health researchers.

Disseminating Knowledge: NCCAM provides objective, evidence-based information to scientists, health care providers, and the general public through a variety of approaches, including emerging technology and platforms (i.e., video, social media, and mobile applications) and an information-rich Web site (www.nccam.nih.gov). Through these multi-media approaches, science-based evidence on many aspects of complementary and integrative health practices is made available to a broad audience.

Overall IC Budget Policy:
Guided by its strategic plan, the advice of the National Advisory Council for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, and input from a diverse community of stakeholders, NCCAM builds the scientific evidence base for complementary and integrative medicine by stimulating research and increasing research capacity. In FY 2015, NCCAM will continue to fund multidisciplinary investigator-initiated research and encourage interdisciplinary research capacity building across the field of complementary and integrative health research. Areas of special emphasis include studies examining the effectiveness of complementary and integrative health approaches to alleviate chronic pain, and translational research to improve the quality, reproducibility, and comparability of clinical complementary and integrative health research.

1  Nahin RL, Barnes PM, Stussman BA, et al. Costs of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and frequency of visits to CAM practitioners: United States, 2007. CDC National Health Statistics Report #18. 2009.

2  Lamas GA, Goertz C, Boineau R, Mark DB, Rozema T, Nahin RL, Lindblad L, Lewis EF, Drisko J, Lee KL, Effect of disodium EDTA chelation regimen on cardiovascular events in patients with previous myocardial infarction: the TACT randomized trial. JAMA, 2013 Mar 27;309(12):1241–50.

3  IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2011. “Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research.” Washington DC: The National Academies Press.

Program Descriptions and Accomplishments

Extramural Basic Research: Basic research on fundamental biological effects and active components of interventions is central to the development of the evidence base on complementary health approaches, and underpins the design of clinical research. NCCAM supports investigator-initiated basic research and will continue, through targeted initiatives, its support for basic and translational research on promising complementary interventions. For example, NCCAM funds Centers of Excellence for Research on Complementary and Alternative Medicine which focus on basic, mechanistic, and translational research of a variety of complementary interventions. Other funding opportunities include Mechanistic Research on CAM Natural Products, Botanical Dietary Supplement Research Centers, and a new initiative to establish a Center for Advancing Natural Products Technology and Innovation.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2015 President’s Budget estimate for extramural basic research is $39.017 million or 0.3 percent above the FY 2014 level.

Extramural Clinical Research: The NCCAM extramural research program funds clinical investigations on complementary practices and health interventions. Projects range from small pilot studies to large-scale clinical trials and epidemiological studies, including several collaborations between NIH Institutes and Centers and other government agencies. For example, the results of a large clinical trial support by NCCAM and NHLBI on the efficacy of using chelating agents to prevent heart attacks showed that patients who had suffered a prior heart attack showed a modest reduction in the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, but most importantly, a significant positive effect in diabetic patients, including reduced mortality. In FY 2014, NCCAM, in conjunction with NIDA and VA, plans to support several studies on the non-pharmacological management of pain and other symptoms experienced by military personnel and veterans.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2015 President’s Budget estimate for extramural clinical research is $53.271 million or 0.5 percent above the FY 2014 level.

Program Portrait: Research on Nonpharmacological Management of Pain and Co-Morbid Conditions in U.S. Military and Veteran Populations

FY 2014: $2.6 million

FY 2015: $2.6 million

Change: $0.0 million

NCCAM has embarked on a program to stimulate research on the use of complementary approaches to reduce pain and improve symptom management in military and veteran populations. These populations struggle with tremendous health challenges including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and substance abuse problems. For many, these conditions are further exacerbated by co-morbid pain disorders.

The health care needs of military personnel and veterans and the substantial interest by the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs (VA) in using complementary approaches for pain and symptom management present an opportunity, and a critically identified need to study the utilization, mechanisms, efficacy, and effectiveness of these approaches. In fact, several research studies suggest that mind-body interventions like meditation or mindfulness, yoga, acupuncture, massage, and cognitive-behavioral interventions, may hold promise for managing some of the symptoms experienced by military personnel and veterans, though additional research is warranted.

To encourage research and further efforts that will expand the evidence base for the use of nonpharmacological approaches to manage pain and co-morbid symptoms, NCCAM is collaborating with the VA and the National Institute on Drug Abuse on new funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) in FY 2014. Specifically, these FOAs support pilot studies, clinical trials, health services research, and observational studies to examine complementary and integrative health approaches for pain and co-morbid conditions such as PTSD, TBI, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and substance abuse among military personnel and veterans. Research findings from these initiatives are expected to guide clinical decision-making and lead to enhanced patient care and improved pain and symptom management through better integration of evidence-based complementary approaches. Currently, grant applications for these FOAs are undergoing scientific merit review and grant awards are anticipated to be made in the summer of 2014.

Extramural Research Training and Capacity Building: Improving the capacity of the field to carry out rigorous research of complementary health interventions is a high priority for NCCAM. To increase the number, quality, and diversity of investigators who conduct research on complementary approaches, NCCAM supports a variety of training and career development activities for pre- and post-doctoral students, researchers, and clinicians. For example, NCCAM has developed an innovative training program, Interdisciplinary Complementary and Integrative Health Clinical Research Training Award, that will fund partnerships between research intensive institutions and institutions focused on rigorous clinical research and training of practitioners in complementary modalities.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2015 President’s Budget estimate for extramural research training and capacity building is $8.355 million or 1.1 percent above the FY 2014 level.

Intramural Research: As highlighted in the program portrait, NCCAM’s intramural research program is focused on understanding the central mechanisms of pain and its modulation, with the long term goal of improving clinical management of chronic pain through the integration of pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches. Among topics of particular interest are the pathways and mechanisms by which emotion, attention, placebo effects, and other such processes modulate pain or pain processing. The program both engages and leverages the exceptional basic and clinical research talent and resources of other neuroscience and neuroimaging efforts within the NIH intramural community.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2015 President’s Budget estimate for intramural research is $8.212 million or 1.0 percent above the FY 2014 level.

Program Portrait: Intramural Research Program: Understanding the Central Mechanisms of Pain

FY 2014: $8.1 million

FY 2015: $8.2 million

Change: $0.1 million

Better management of pain, especially chronic pain, is a critical public health need. To address this concern, NCCAM is committed to understanding the central mechanisms of pain and how complementary health practices can produce beneficial effects. As such, NCCAM’s Intramural Research Program is dedicated to the study of the brain’s role in perceiving, modifying and managing pain, with the long term goal of improving clinical management of chronic pain through the integration of pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches.

Based on recommendations from a Blue Ribbon Intramural Research Strategic Planning Panel, NCCAM has honed the focus of the Intramural Research Program to align with one of its three central strategic priorities – to advance the science and practice of symptom management. The Intramural Research Program is led by Scientific Director Dr. Catherine Bushnell, an internationally recognized pain and neuroscience researcher. Under her leadership, the Pain and Integrative Neuroscience (PAIN) laboratory was established with a focus on studying mechanisms underlying nonpharmacological modulation of pain. It includes both a basic neuroscience program and a human brain imaging and sensory testing program.

Currently, the PAIN Laboratory is conducting research on:

  • Effects of stress on pain processing, examining how stress can either lead to hyperalgesia or analgesia, depending on the timing and context;
  • How exercise affects pain and the neural mechanisms underlying such modulation, looking at the release of endogenous opioids in the brain during pain;
  • Potential differences in pain processing and brain functioning between people who practice yoga regularly and those who do not; and
  • Differences in pain modulation between chronic pain patients and healthy individuals.

Research Management and Support (RMS): Through its RMS activities, NCCAM provides administrative, budgetary, logistical, and scientific support in the review, award, monitoring, and management of research grants, training, awards, and contracts. In addition, the Center provides reliable, objective, and science- and evidence-based information to the public, scientists, and healthcare providers so they may make informed decisions about the use of complementary and integrative health therapies.

Budget Policy:
The FY 2015 President’s Budget estimate for research management and support is $15.655 million or 1.0 percent above the FY 2014 level.

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Budget Authority by Object Class1
(Dollars in Thousands)
  FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY 2014
1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
Total compensable workyears:
  Full-time employment 74 74 0
  Full-time equivalent of overtime and holiday hours 0 0 0
  Average ES salary $0 $0 $0
  Average GM/GS grade 12.4 12.4 0.0
  Average GM/GS salary $105 $105 $0
  Average salary, grade established by act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) $0 $0 $0
  Average salary of ungraded positions $0 $0 $0
OBJECT CLASSES FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY 2014
  Personnel Compensation:      
11.1 Full-Time Permanent $6,343 $6,406 $63
11.3 Other Than Full-Time Permanent 1,732 1,750 17
11.5 Other Personnel Compensation 71 71 1
11.7 Military Personnel 239 241 2
11.8 Special Personnel Services Payments 325 328 3
11.9 Subtotal Personnel Compensation $8,710 $8,797 $87
12.1 Civilian Personnel Benefits $2,374 $2,457 $83
12.2 Military Personnel Benefits 123 124 1
13.0 Benefits to Former Personnel 0 0 0
  Subtotal Pay Costs $11,207 $11,378 $171
21.0 Travel & Transportation of Persons $168 $171 $3
22.0 Transportation of Things 30 31 1
23.1 Rental Payments to GSA 0 0 0
23.2 Rental Payments to Others 3 3 0
23.3 Communications, Utilities & Misc. Charges 128 130 2
24.0 Printing & Reproduction 0 0 0
25.1 Consulting Services $346 $346 $0
25.2 Other Services 5,215 4,569 ‑647
25.3 Purchase of goods and services from government accounts $13,147 $13,501 $355
25.4 Operation & Maintenance of Facilities $87 $87 $0
25.5 R&D Contracts 1,555 1,755 200
25.6 Medical Care 0 0 0
25.7 Operation & Maintenance of Equipment 82 83 1
25.8 Subsistence & Support of Persons 0 0 0
25.0 Subtotal Other Contractual Services $20,432 $20,342 ‑$90
26.0 Supplies & Materials $443 $444 $0
31.0 Equipment 455 463 8
32.0 Land and Structures 0 0 0
33.0 Investments & Loans 0 0 0
41.0 Grants, Subsidies & Contributions 91,259 91,548 289
42.0 Insurance Claims & Indemnities 0 0 0
43.0 Interest & Dividends 0 0 0
44.0 Refunds 0 0 0
  Subtotal Non-Pay Costs $112,918 $113,131 $213
  Total Budget Authority by Object Class 124,125 $124,509 $384

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Salaries and Expenses
(Dollars in Thousands)
OBJECT CLASSES FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President's Budget FY 2015 +/- FY 2014
Personnel Compensation:      
Full-Time Permanent (11.1) $6,343 $6,406 $63
Other Than Full-Time Permanent (11.3) 1,732 1,750 17
Other Personnel Compensation (11.5) 71 71 1
Military Personnel (11.7) 239 241 2
Special Personnel Services Payments (11.8) 325 328 3
Subtotal Personnel Compensation (11.9) $8,710 $8,797 $87
Civilian Personnel Benefits (12.1) $2,374 $2,457 $83
Military Personnel Benefits (12.2) 123 124 1
Benefits to Former Personnel (13.0) 0 0 0
Subtotal, Pay Costs $11,207 $11,378 $171
Travel & Transportation of Persons (21.0) $168 $171 $3
Transportation of Things (22.0) 30 31 1
Rental Payments to Others (23.2) 3 3 0
Communications, Utilities & Misc. Charges (23.3) 128 130 2
Printing & Reproduction (24.0) 0 0 0
Other Contractual Services:      
Consultant Services (25.1) 0 0 0
Other Services (25.2) 5,215 4,569 ‑647
Purchases from Government Accounts (25.3) 5,292 5,010 ‑282
Operation & Maintenance of Facilities (25.4) 0 0 0
Operation & Maintenance of Equipment (25.7) 82 83 1
Subsistence & Support of Persons (25.8) 0 0 0
Subtotal Other Contractual Services $10,589 $9,661 ‑$927
Supplies & Materials (26.0) $443 $444 $0
Subtotal, Non-Pay Costs $11,361 $10,440 ‑$921
Total, Administrative Costs $22,568 $21,818 ‑$750

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Detail of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTE)
OFFICE/DIVISION FY 2013 Actual FY 2014 Est. FY 2015 Est.
Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total Civilian Military Total
1 Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
Division of Extramural Activities                  
Direct: 2   2 2   2 2   2
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 2   2 2   2 2   2
Division of Intramural Research Program                  
Direct: 6 2 8 6 2 8 6 2 8
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6 2 8 6 2 8 6 2 8
Division of Scientific Review                  
Direct: 5   5 5   5 5   5
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 5   5 5   5 5   5
Manual and Mind Body Branch                  
Direct: 2   2 -   -     -
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 2   2 -   -     -
Natural Products Branch                  
Direct: 2   2 -   -     -
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 2   2 -   -     -
Office of Administrative Operations                  
Direct: 14   14 14   14 14   14
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 14   14 14   14 14   14
Office of Clinical and Regulatory Affairs                  
Direct: 5   5 5   5 5   5
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 5   5 5   5 5   5
Office of Communications and Public Liaison                  
Direct: 7   7 7   7 7   7
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 7   7 7   7 7   7
Office of Extramural Research                  
Direct: 10 1 11 14 1 15 14 1 15
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 10 1 11 14 1 15 14 1 15
Office of Grants Management                  
Direct: 6   6 6   6 6   6
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6   6 6   6 6   6
Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation                  
Direct: 6   6 6   6 6   6
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6   6 6   6 6   6
Office of the Director                  
Direct: 6   6 6   6 6   6
Reimbursable: - - - - - - - - -
Total: 6   6 6   6 6   6
Total1 71 3 74 71 3 74 71 3 74
FTEs supported by funds from Cooperative Research and Development Agreements. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Detail of Full-Time Equivalent Employment (FTE) (continued)
FISCAL YEAR Average GS Grade
2011 12.6
2012 12.7
2013 12.4
2014 12.4
2015 12.4

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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Detail of Positions
GRADE FY 2013 Final FY 2014 Enacted FY 2015 President’s Budget
Includes FTEs whose payroll obligations are supported by the NIH Common Fund.
Total, ES Positions 0 0 0
Total, ES Salary 0 0 0
GM/GS-15 8 8 8
GM/GS-14 23 23 23
GM/GS-13 11 11 11
GS-12 7 7 7
GS-11 5 5 5
GS-10 0 0 0
GS-9 4 4 4
GS-8 2 2 2
GS-7 3 3 3
GS-6 0 0 0
GS-5 0 0 0
GS-4 1 1 1
GS-3 1 1 1
GS-2 0 0 0
GS-1 0 0 0
Subtotal 65 65 65
Grades established by Act of July 1, 1944 (42 U.S.C. 207) 0 0 0
Assistant Surgeon General 0 0 0
Director Grade 0 0 0
Senior Grade 0 0 0
Full Grade 2 2 2
Senior Assistant Grade 1 1 1
Assistant Grade 0 0 0
Subtotal 3 3 3
Ungraded 10 10 10
Total permanent positions 66 66 66
Total positions, end of year 78 78 78
Total full-time equivalent (FTE) employment, end of year 74 74 74
Average ES salary 0 0 0
Average GM/GS grade 12.4 12.4 12.4
Average GM/GS salary 104,567 104,567 104,567

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